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To Quit or Not to Quit?

The first step to freedom from addiction is recognizing there's a problem and it's beyond your ability to control it.

 

To quit or not to quit? That is the question ...

Not quite the same as the famous William Shakespeare quote but hopefully I got your attention if you're even thinking you might possibly have an addiction problem.

The first step to freedom from addiction is recognizing there's a problem and it's beyond your ability to control it.

The second step is believing that a power greater than yourself can eliminate the addiction and restore you to sanity.

The third step is to turn your will, i.e. your life, over to the care of God, as you understand him.

These are the first actions that must be taken in the 12-step program that was started in 1935 by Bob Smith, a surgeon from Ohio and Bill Wilson, a stockbroker from New York.

Called Alcoholics Anonymous, the program has helped countless thousands of people recover and has worked with other addictions, as well.

If you're "ready to go to any lengths" to beat the addiction, then you're ready to "take certain steps," says the fifth chapter of Alcoholics Anonymous' Big Book.

I've seen a lot of people over the years come into the program, but they don't take the steps, which work, but must be acted upon.

Many people are unwilling to admit that they have an addiction even when it's quite obvious.

It starts out as a fun thing, or even a fling, but somewhere along the line you lose your ability to control it.

You might want to read about some of the methods tried to control and "enjoy" what starts out as a fun thing but seems to get worse, not better, as time goes on.

That's why they call addiction a progressive "disease."

I didn't really want to get into the specifics of alcoholism, mainly because all the 12-step program books are written differently, but the basic premise is the same.

I heard it said of the first three steps simply as: I can't (control this addiction any longer). He can (we've made a decision to turn the problem over to God). I think I'll let Him (pray for removal of the addiction and work the rest of the program).

Simple, but not easy!

Stay tuned for additional steps to recovery from any addiction and get your life back!

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

MichaelJ February 24, 2013 at 04:48 AM
Thank you for tackling this subject. Many have family or friends that are going through difficult times and need a friend to give them simple, caring and lovig advice.
Mckenna Smith February 24, 2013 at 05:41 AM
Sounds liike a recovering alcoholic. Happy for your sobriety, but hope your not a dry drunk. My family has struggled with addiction problems & the only way we've overcome them is by confronting them. Admire your courage.

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